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Birding Report

Almost all of the birds currently being seen at Presqu'ile Provincial Park are probably breeding in the Park, and in some cases that was confirmed this week.  The roster includes birds of various habitats: water birds, marsh birds, forest birds, birds of the shore, meadow birds.

A female WOOD DUCK led her four tiny ducklings in a heads-down race across the road, with traffic coming in both directions.  Three of that species were in the marsh this afternoon.  The sight of five REDHEADS in Popham Bay was not unusual at this time of year, unlike the WHITE-WINGED SCOTER that was there on Saturday.  On the morning of June 14 a COMMON LOON was sitting on its nest, and by the following morning the two adults were in the adjacent water, accompanied by two tiny fledglings.  PIED-BILLED GREBES are in the marsh and in the woodpile marsh, where a family of them was raised a year or two ago.  A LEAST BITTERN flew across the causeway outside the Park gate, and on two different days one was calling within earshot of the marsh boardwalk.  GREAT EGRETS and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS appear to be nesting on the offshore islands.  On June 12, a day after a minor shorebird fallout, a single SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and a single DUNLIN still remained.  A reported LEAST SANDPIPER on June 16 would be a record late date for a spring migrant if confirmed.  A rare bird report should be filed with the Park.  Any non-breeding shorebirds that appear during the remainder of this month or in early July could be referred to as either spring or fall migrants.  Two BONAPARTE'S GULLS on June 16 and a GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL on June 17 were also late.

Three of the four BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO observations this spring were in the vicinity of the Owen Point trail parking lot, including one on Monday between there and Lookout #1 on that trail.  The small BANK SWALLOW colony in the day use area appears to be thriving.  On two different days (June 12 and 16) an errant PINE SISKIN spent much of the day at the feeder at 186 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.