Birding Report | Birding Report

GO TO:   The News Room  |  The Friends   |   The Park

Facebook      Twitter

News
Back to News
Birding Report

With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, leading to renewed calls for a long overdue cull.  The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.With the spring bird migration in full swing at Presqu'ile Provincial Park, birders are finally welcoming new arrivals other than the waterfowl that ushered in the season.

 

On March 31, the skies were full of migrating CANADA GEESE, by far the largest movement of these birds this spring.  No one has yet sighted any SNOW GEESE, but the possibility exists that they may yet show up.  The invasive MUTE SWANS, bane of the marsh ecosystems, are again seeking breeding sites in unfortunate numbers, The only other three swans seen in the past week, either TUNDRA SWANS or TRUMPETER SWANS, were too distant to identify as to species.  Now that there is some open water in the marsh, dabbling ducks have suddenly appeared in good numbers, including WOOD DUCKS, AMERICAN WIGEONS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAILS, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL among others.  The usual diving ducks are also present, among them more LESSER SCAUP, a few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, plenty of HOODED MERGANSERS, and up to five RUDDY DUCKS.

RUFFED GROUSE were seen on two different days.  Six WILD TURKEYS were in the calf pasture on Tuesday.  The RED-THROATED LOON first seen on March 11 was still present on the weekend.  Two COMMON LOONS were sighted this week.  PIED-BILLED, HORNED, and RED-NECKED GREBES are being seen on most days.  DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS are now a daily sighting.  A GREAT BLUE HERON was hiding in the marsh this afternoon.  A report of a GREAT EGRET from just outside the Park will surely be followed by many more of this species, which breeds on High Bluff Island.  Interesting raptors seen this week include TURKEY VULTURE, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, COOPER'S HAWK, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.  A record early SANDHILL CRANE was heard on March 28. AMERICAN WOODCOCKS have begun performing their crepuscular displays.  An ICELAND GULL was seen on March 27.  The only owl of the week was a BARRED OWL.

On March 31 a NORTHERN SHRIKE was still present.  The first EASTERN PHOEBES and TREE SWALLOW were seen this morning.  There were COMMON RAVEN sightings on two different days.  A HOARY REDPOLL continues to visit the feeders at 83 Bayshore Road.

To reach Presqu'ile Provincial Park, follow the signs from Brighton.

Locations within the Park are shown on a map at the back of a tabloid that is available at the Park gate. Access to the offshore islands is restricted from March 10 onward to prevent disturbance to the colonial nesting birds there. 
Birders are encouraged to record their observations on the bird sightings board provided near the campground office by The Friends of Presqu'ile Park and to fill out a rare bird report for species not listed there.

Questions and comments about bird sightings at Presqu'ile may be directed to: FHELLEINER@TRENTU.CA.